Cordillo Downs

Cordillo Downs UnmatchedInsufficient information exists but we strongly believe a horse has the old blood lines Wilpena Pound Mabel Creek Yambah Lyndavale Newhaven GoGo Mt Riddock Hermannsburg Ringwood Todd River Downs Loves Creek Mt Weld Callide Range The Garden Jinka Snowy Mountains
Cordillo Downs Waler stallion Dardanelle

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We would love to have more information about Cordillo Downs Station. Horse details, photos, family history any information about the station, people, and Waler horses from there.

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Cordillo Downs

Cordillo Downs or Cordillo Downs Station is both a pastoral lease currently operating as a cattle station and since 2013 a formal bounded locality in South Australia. It is located about 116 kilometres north of Innamincka and 155 kilometres south-east of Birdsville.

The station once occupied an area of 7,800 square kilometres and was regarded as Australia’s largest sheep station, with a record set in the 1880s of shearing over 85,000 sheep in a season. One of the best known features of the station is the heritage-listed woolshed that is constructed of stone with a curved tin roof, built this way due to a lack of timber in the area. At the turn of the century Cordillo Downs was big enough to have its own Post Office, opened in 1893, saddler, blacksmith, police station, only manned at shearing time and polling boxes during elections. Along with supplies, these boxes were carried by camels from Farina, up the Strzelecki Track, returning with wool. This 1,200km round trip often took two months to complete. Although trucks were used by this time, camels continued to bring in supplies until the 1940s. 

One unlucky Afghan cameleer, Mulloch Mahomet, accidentally shot himself in his thigh and died at Toorawatchie on the Cordillo track in 1892. A year later, on 25 October 1893 William Hoskin, aged thirty-five, died of thirst on the same track. He was not the last one. In 1900, Ah Hang, a part Aboriginal-Chinese boundary rider died of thirst at Cordillo. His bones were not found until 1906.

The surrounding country is harsh, described as stony table lands ending in abrupt cliffs, red sandhills covered with spinifex, or else bare and barren, here and there a salt lake shining and dazzling like a lake full of diamonds. Tough isolated country for preservation of old Waler horse genes and characteristics. Cordillo horses were largely obtained in 1988, with a truckload from Alice Springs originally destined for Peterborough meatworks coming to Victoria via Queensland, then a smaller sub-set of those traveling on to Tasmania. Still with more bone and tendon than modern breeds, these horses are solid coloured, lighter types, with a look at me presence prized for Officer’s horses.

Our poster boy from Cordillo Downs, stallion Dardanelle, led the Hobart ANZAC Day Parade in 1990, just a few months after his first handling. He was the first horse in the parade since 1949 and was accompanied by the last surviving Light Horseman, 94 year-old Ray Chatterton, who died the following year.

Cordillo Downs – 27 Horse Listings
Name (Also known as)
Gender
Acq. Year
Description
Testing
Registration
Deceased
Colour
Markings
Type
Parentage DNA
Breed Ancestry
Mare
1988
Stallion
1988
Silver Bay
Light
WHSA
Mare
Grey
Mare
1988
WHOBAA
Mare
1988
Black
WHSA
Gelding
1988
Gelding
1989
Black
Light
WHOBAA
Stallion
1989
Black
Star
Medium
WHOBAA
Gelding
1988
Brown
WHSA
Mare
1989
Bay
Light
WHSA
Kadaitcha Man (Beeandah Caddie)
Stallion
Black
Light
WHSA
Mare
1988
Black
Star
WHSA
Mare
1988
Magdabar (Magdhaba)
Mare
1987
Black
WHSA/WHOBAA
Mare
Silver bay
Light
Mare
1988
Bay / Brown
WHSA
Mare
1989
Brown
Light
WHSA
Stallion
1989
Bay
Light
WHSA
Mare
1985
Bay
WHSA
Mare
1987
Brown/Black
Light
WHSA
Mare
1982
Bay
WHSA
Tipperary (Tippy)
Mare
1989
Bay
Star
Light
WHSA / WHOBAA
Stallion
1985
Brown
WHSA
Stallion?
1988
Gelding
1988
Bay
Gelding
1988
Brown
WHSA
Mare
1989
Bay
WHSA

Posted by Angela Tiede

Educator and Waler advocate and owner since 2006.